Things To Consider While Planning A Juice Diet

Some Juicy Information

A typical 12-ounce can of pop provides 10 teaspoons of sugar. Many of us are aware of this. But do we think about this when it comes to fruit drinks? Unfortunately, there are imposter beverages out there masquerading as real juice. When a label says 100% real fruit juice, be reassured that you have the real deal and will get the vitamins and minerals that come with that particular fruit. When the label says fruit cocktail, fruit drink or fruit beverage, it’s possible it contains as little as 10% real juice, if any. These products are essentially non-carbonated pop and can supply the same amount of sugar as cola or root beer.

Because I’m frequently asked if juice can fit into a healthy diet, I’ve come up with these guiding principles:

  • Juice is not a requirement. Whole fruit is usually a much better choice. It provides nutrients along with the staying power of fibre.
  • Juice is not recommended for babies under 6 months and should only be given once baby can drink from a cup. Limit intake to 4 ounces (half a cup per day). Juice can displace appetite for food.
  • For growing kids, limit juice to 1 cup/day. Unfortunately, childhood obesity experts cite juice as a contributing factor to weight gain. The exception is if you have underweight, active kids or teens who need the calories. In this case, allow 100% real fruit juice.
  • For adults, 100% real juices like cranberry or orange added to club soda with a squeeze of lime or lemon make a great, fizzy, summertime refresher that nourishes, hydrates and has far fewer calories than pop.
  • Juice is a great ingredient when blended with yogurt and fruit then frozen into treats. Far healthier than most commercial frozen treats. In our home, we make all kinds of combos but a couple favourites are bananas, yogurt and orange juice OR strawberries, strawberry yogurt and cranberry juice. What are your favourite ways to enjoy juice the healthy way?