Smart Eating Guide

Training Table 

When it comes to smart eating, one size doesn’t fit all hockey players. Each person is unique, with different tastes and individual nutrient and energy needs. Canada’s Food Guide takes into account some of these differences and outlines the number of servings that your hockey player should have in a given day. In some categories, ranges are provided to help decide how many servings are needed based on physical activity level and body size:

Hockey Age Category Age (years) Sex Vegetables and Fruit Grain Products Milk and Alternatives Meat and Alternatives
Mite 3 M/F 4 3 2 1
4 M/F 5 4 2 1
Tyke 5 - 6 M/F 5 4 2 1
Novice 7 - 8 M/F 5 4 2 1
Atom 9 - 10 M/F 6 6 3 - 4 1 - 2
Peewee 11 - 12 M/F 6 6 3 - 4 1 - 2
Bantam 13 M/F 6 6 3 - 4 1 - 2
14 F 7 6 3 - 4 2
14 M 8 7 3 - 4 3
Midget 15 - 17 F 7 6 3 - 4 2
15 - 17 M 8 7 3 - 4 3
Juvenile 18 F 7 6 3 - 4 2
18 M 8 7 3 - 4 3

The Food Guide provides clear information on how large serving sizes of different types of foods should be:

  • Vegetables and Fruit: 1 serving is 125 mL (1/2 cup) fresh, frozen, canned vegetables or fruit, or cooked leafy vegetables; 250 mL (1 cup) raw leafy vegetables; or 1 medium fruit.
  • Grain products: 1 serving is 1 slice of bread; 125 mL (½ cup) cooked rice, pasta, or quinoa; or ½ a pita or tortilla.
  • Milk and Alternatives: 1 serving is 250 mL (1 cup) milk or fortified soy beverage; 175 g (¾ cup) yogurt or kefir; or 50 g (1 ½ oz.) cheese.
  • Meat and Alternatives: 1 serving is 75 g (2 ½ oz.) fish, poultry, shellfish or meat; 175 mL (3/4 cup) cooked legumes; 2 eggs, 150 g or 175 mL (3/4 cup) tofu; 30 mL (2 tablespoons) of peanut or nut butters; 60 mL (1/4 cup) nuts and seeds.

Eating foods from each group offers the variety of nutrients your hockey player needs to perform his or her best! It is also important to have variety within each of the food groups, since no food supplies all the nutrients. For instance, a juicy orange supplies folate, but not beta-carotene; cantaloupe is high in beta-carotene, but not folate. Also, variety makes sense—combining nutritious foods of different colours, textures, tastes, shapes, and temperatures makes meals more appealing. Following Canada’s Food Guide, eating a variety of foods, and drinking plenty of fluids will help your hockey player to perform at the top of his or her game!

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