Sweet, purplish-black blackberries are closely related to the raspberries they resemble, but are a different fruit than black raspberries. The largest of the wild berries, blackberries are also called brambles due to the prickly shrubs they grow on. Blackberries are an excellent source of vitamin C.


  • Blackberries are in season May through August.


  • Select plump, almost black-coloured berries that are slightly soft and have no attached hulls. (Hulls indicate immature berries that taste tart.)
  • If packaged in a carton, check to make sure there are no juice stains at the bottom of the carton, or moldy or crushed berries inside.


  • Fresh blackberries are very perishable and should be used as soon as possible after purchasing for best results.
  • Refrigerate unwashed blackberries in a single layer covered with a damp paper towel for 1 or 2 days. Discard any moldy berries before storing.
  • For longer storage, freeze washed and dried blackberries by placing them in a single layer on a baking pan. Freeze until hard, then transfer to freezer bags. Store frozen blackberries for up to 10 months.


  • Remove and discard any damaged berries. Gently rinse under cold water just before using. Spread them out on paper towels to dry.
  • Use a food processor or blender to purée blackberries for sauces. Pour the purée through a sieve before using to strain out the seeds.


  • Sprinkle fresh blackberries over bowls of your favourite cereal
  • Add blackberries to summer smoothies and shakes.
  • Replace one-quarter of the fresh fruit in your favourite baked pie, crisp or cobbler with blackberries. Apples and blackberries are a classic English pie filling.
  • Garnish Cheesecake with fresh blackberries and mint sprigs.
  • Sprinkle a tablespoon of sugar over a pint of fresh blackberries and let stand at room temperature for 30 minutes. Serve the syrupy berry sauce over scoops of vanilla ice cream.