The unmistakable fragrance of cilantro in Thai, Vietnamese, Indian or Mexican dishes offers a unique and immediate connection to the promise of lively fresh flavour.

This leafy green herb, also known as fresh coriander or chinese parsley, is available year-round in most grocery stores. Choose cilantro with roots attached as the roots make a lively addition to Asian dishes for added flavour.

Cilantro compliments other fresh ingredients and is a great addition to hot, spicy dishes. Thought to be the world's most widely used herb, it is often used fresh and at the last moment to preserve its delicate flavour which can be lost when added too soon to a hot dish. Chopped or torn, cilantro will fill you with a distinctly fresh experience. The flavour profile of cilantro is assertive and it goes well with spicey foods. For some, cilantro has a distinctive taste: it hints of sage and citrus. For others, it tastes like soap.

Herbal Notes

  • Choose fresh, bright green herbs. Avoid brown edges and wilted leaves.
  • Similar to a bunch of flowers, place cilantro stem-down in a glass of water. Cover with a plastic bag and refrigerate up to a week.
  • Wash herbs just before using and pat dry with a paper towel.
  • When adding herbs to a warm dish, add near the end of cooking time.
  • When adding herbs to a cold dish, cover and refrigerate for several hours to blend flavours.

Pairs Well With

  • avocado, cucumbers, salad, tomatoes
  • dried beans
  • turkey, chicken, chile


  • Sprinkle chopped cilantro on stir-fries or tacos.
  • Stir cilantro into sauces for a tangy kick.
  • Mix a little chopped cilantro with Kraft Mayo Mayonnaise for a great sandwich spread.
  • Blend chopped cilantro into softened butter, then melt over ears of hot cooked corn or other cooked vegetables.
  • Instead of chopping cilantro with a knife, try snipping with kitchen scissors. It's easier and the cilantro will stay nice and green.